FUNGAL AND BACTERIAL RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIOME ASSOCIATED WITH SELECTED MELON AND SNAKE MELON GENOTYPES

Authors

  • Rania AYDI BEN ABDALLAH Regional Research Centre on Horticulture and Organic Agriculture, University of Sousse, 4042, Tunisia https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7875-4652
  • Hela Chikh-Rouhou UR13AGR09-Integrated Horticultural Production in the Tunisian Centre-East, Regional Research Centre on Horticulture and Organic Agriculture, University of Sousse, 4042, Chott-Mariem, Tunisia. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3631-5680
  • Hayfa Jabnoun-Khiareddine UR13AGR09-Integrated Horticultural Production in the Tunisian Centre-East, Regional Research Centre on Horticulture and Organic Agriculture, University of Sousse, 4042, Chott-Mariem, Tunisia.
  • Rafika Sta-Baba
  • Mejda Daami-Remadi UR13AGR09-Integrated Horticultural Production in the Tunisian Centre-East, Regional Research Centre on Horticulture and Organic Agriculture, University of Sousse, 4042, Chott-Mariem, Tunisia. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2239-5624

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15414/jmbfs.4004

Keywords:

Cucumis melo, Fruit yield, Genotype, Soil microbial community

Abstract

The composition of rhizospheric microbial community may be shaped by plant genotype. Forty five melon (Cucumis melo L.) and seven snake melon (Cucumis melo var. flexuosus) genotypes were tested for their growth and yield parameters compared to a commercial melon cultivar “Star plus”. To estimate the microbial community in the rhizospheric soil of these genotypes, soil dilution plating technique on specific agar medium was used and compared to control. The majority of melon genotypes showed significantly comparable height, fruit weight and fruit yield per plant as “Star plus”. The fruit yield per plant varied significantly depending on tested genotypes. The total bacterial population in the rhizosphere of ten melon and two snake melon genotypes was significantly 59 to 68% higher than control soil. For most tested genotypes, a significant increase in the culturable rhizospheric actinomycetes, about 28.5 to 92.6%, was recorded comparatively to control soil. Fungal population counts in the rhizosphere of tested genotypes were significantly comparable to control. The genotypic difference in melon and snake melon reflects the quantum and diversity of their microbiomes that melon breeders could benefit when seeking at the holobiont concept to include associated microbiomes in breeding programs.

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Published

2021-10-01

How to Cite

AYDI BEN ABDALLAH, R., Chikh-Rouhou, H., Jabnoun-Khiareddine, H., Sta-Baba, R., & Daami-Remadi, M. (2021). FUNGAL AND BACTERIAL RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIOME ASSOCIATED WITH SELECTED MELON AND SNAKE MELON GENOTYPES. Journal of Microbiology, Biotechnology and Food Sciences, e4004. https://doi.org/10.15414/jmbfs.4004

Issue

Section

Microbiology
Received 2020-11-25
Accepted 2021-06-08
Online Published 2021-10-01